White Christmas In Japan

Hikone jinja shrine.

Snow lines the top of the torii gate of Hikone Jinja.

A chilly Christmas Day in Japan, while no match for the Antipodean holiday, is a chance to enjoy aching familiar traditions that were slightly altered as they came through a different cultural lens. An opportunity to experience the romance of a date on Christmas Eve followed by a day of overindulgence in KFC chicken.

Or maybe to simply appreciate the wintry scenery, of snow covered temples and shrines that challenge our image of the traditional Christmas-time view.

Stone and snow: Small Buddhist pagoda dominate the otherwise featureless hill-top.

Stone and snow: Small Buddhist pagoda dominate the otherwise featureless hill-top.

Shining drips of snow-melt falling as the sun comes out.

Shining drips of snow-melt falling as the sun comes out, a few late season maple leaves defying the cold.

Irrigation canals for rice-fields in summer, in winter carry away the melting snow.

Irrigation canals for rice-fields in summer, in winter carry away the melting snow.

Merry Christmas and happy holidays to everyone, no matter where they are in the world. I wish us all a safe, fun day.

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6 thoughts on “White Christmas In Japan

  1. We had a few light snow showers here in Sakai city on Christmas Eve. No snow on the ground but enough to give a little seasonal touch. We had a western-style Christmas dinner at home (at no small effort and expense!), so no KFC for us!

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  2. Thank you following my blog. i live in Awaji Island. you also live in Japan.  Please teach me Japanese something that you saw from the foreign country.  I’ll be counting on you.

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    • Thanks for the comment ^^ My husband’s cousin lives on Awaji shima – she says it’s very beautiful.

      I also have a blog about Australia if you want to read about foreign countries ^^

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      • What are the chances? Your cousin just lives on same island. I want to visit your blog about Australia. But, I can only read a little English, so I just will visit it.

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  3. Pingback: Where Next Japan? | Where Next Japan

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